Air Cargo Newsdesk

How artificial intelligence will convert aviation data into insight

How artificial intelligence will convert aviation data into insight

INVESTMENT in artificial intelligence (AI) systems in the commercial aviation industry is expected to exceed more than US$2223m by 2024, new research predicts, writes Thelma Etim.

Wholesale changes to airport operations introduced over the last 20 years in response to the exponential expansion of the global aviation industry, are now forcing airport authorities and airlines to search for alternative approaches to the management of the complex ecosystem of aviation operations, suggests a number of reports.

The growth in the use of AI is being driven by several major factors, including the increased adoption of cloud-based applications and services – the ‘smart’ airports trend is a typical example – as is the dramatic increase in capital investment required by all aviation corporations.

Another major influencing factor is the gradual integration of crypto-currency blockchain transactions, a development which will lead to vast improvements in the operational efficiency and transparency of the industry’s workflow and workforce.

‘Artificial intelligence is currently being developed faster than regulators’ abilities to govern its use…’

Blockchain technology, where all relevant data is captured publicly on a database and is then automatically shared between a network of computers, can be implemented by manufacturers and airline operators alike for comprehensive data sharing and reconciliation, leading to reduction of the multiple complexities associated with cross-enterprise business processes.

However, cybersecurity remains a major concern. The collection of huge amounts of data for legitimate analysis may also be at risk of being available for abuse by hackers and miscreants.

The possible impact of cyberattacks ranges from endangering the safety of an aircraft, to affecting operational reliability, financial health and business continuity, a report stresses.

Broader research also reveals mounting disquiet surrounding the growing accountability gap between those who build artificial intelligence systems and those who stand to be affected by them.

The problem is that artificial intelligence is currently being developed faster than regulators’ abilities to govern its use, warns an AI Now report affiliated with New York University.

This situation threatens to consolidate power in those tech companies and the oppressive governments that may deploy AI, while rendering just about everyone else vulnerable to its biases, capacities for intrusive surveillance and myriad other dysfunctions, the report asserts.

The New York study contains 10 recommendations for policymakers as well as a diagnosis of AI’s most potentially destructive trends. “Governments need to regulate AI,” the recommendation exhorts.

Read more stories about blockchain here

Have your say